In much of society, research means to investigate something you do not know or understand.

— Neil Armstrong

RESEARCH

Top five papers which have impacted my career and why (select to expand):

Guidry, J.P.D., Messner, M., Carlyle, K., & Jin, Y. (2015). On pins and needles: How vaccines are portrayed on Pinterest. Vaccine 33, 5051-5056

Vaccination is an effective public health tool for reducing morbidity and mortality caused by infectious diseases. However, increasing numbers of parents question the safety of vaccines or refuse to vaccinate their children outright. The Internet is playing a significant role in the growing voice of the anti-vaccination movement as a growing number of people use the Internet to obtain health information, including information about vaccines. Given the role the Internet plays in providing vaccination-related communication, coupled with limited research in this area, this study focused on the social media platform Pinterest, analyzing 800 vaccine-related pins through a quantitative content analysis. The majority of the pins were anti-vaccine, and most were original posts as opposed to repins. Concerns about vaccine safety and side effects were oft-repeated themes, as was the concept of conspiracy theory. Pro-vaccine pins elicited consistently more engagement than anti-vaccine pins. Health educators and public health organizations should be aware of these dynamics since a successful health communication campaign should start with an understanding of what and how publics communicate about the topic at hand.

My interest in social media and visual health communication burgeoned during my doctoral studies. This publication represents the first study I conceptualized during my coursework (I did my PhD in the US, and therefore had two years of coursework). I chose vaccine-related information on Pinterest because the platform is visual, but entirely under-studied. Moreover, vaccines are a true public health triumph, but their effectiveness is often threatened by the anti-vaccine movement and increased vaccine-hesitancy among. When I started the content analysis in 2014, no one had studied Pinterest and possible health-related messages. Most studies that focused on vaccine-related messages on other social media platforms found that between 50-75% of content was positive toward vaccines. Conversely, our study found that 75% of all vaccine-related pins were strongly vaccine-hesitant. This is particularly concerning as Pinterest is primarily used by women – many of whom are mothers and make healthcare decisions for their families. Alarmingly, no messages about vaccines from public health or healthcare provider accounts were present. To increase the reach of these startling findings to public health and medical audiences, we published it in Vaccine. I did not fully realize the effect it had had until I served on a misinformation panel at George Washington University in 2019, together with the academic liaison for Pinterest. Pinterest had just announced its vaccine information curation on its platform a few months earlier, blocking vaccine-related searches and replacing the results with trustworthy public health messages. To my great surprise, the Pinterest liaison, who presented after me, explained that my article, four years earlier, was one of the primary motivators for them to take action against vaccine misinformation on their platform. It is rare that we behavioral science researchers see direct community impact of the studies we do, especially to such a level – so I am very grateful for this turn of events. In addition, the “On pins and needles” paper functioned in many ways as the start of my own research agenda, focused on visual social media platforms, misinformation, and the mitigation of infectious diseases.

Guidry, J.P.D., Vraga, E., Miller, C.A., Laestadius, L.I., Occa, A., Nan, X., Ming, H., Qin, Y., Fuemmeler, B.F. & Carlyle, K.E. (2020). HPV Vaccine on Pinterest: Before and After Pinterest’s Actions to Moderate Content. American Journal of Public Health, 110 (S3): S305-S311

To compare how human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination was portrayed on Pinterest before and after the platform acted to moderate vaccine-related search results to understand (1) what the ifivenformation environment looked like previously and (2) whether Pinterest’s policy decisions improved this environment in terms of sources and content. In this quantitative content analysis, we compared 2 samples of 500 HPV vaccine–focused Pinterest posts (“pins”) collected before and after Pinterest’s actions to provide more reliable vaccine-related information. Pins were based on search results and were analyzed using the Health Belief Model. The majority of pre-action search results leaned toward vaccine skepticism, specifically focused on perceived vaccine barriers. Few pins were published by public health–related Pinterest accounts. Post-action search results showed a significant shift to HPV vaccination benefits, and the number of pins by government or medical accounts increased. However, the proportion of pins in search results containing HPV content of any type was significantly lower. Pinterest’s efforts to moderate vaccination discussions were largely successful. However, the ban also appeared to limit HPV vaccination search results overall, which may contribute to confusion or an information vacuum.

In many ways, this 2020 article is a follow-up to the “On pins and needles” paper. Pinterest, in 2019, took action to moderate vaccine-related searches on its platform and populate such searches with trustworthy public health posts about vaccines. We (a team of misinformation researchers from five different universities, led by me as first author) compared an HPV-vaccine-focused sample from Pinterest right before Pinterest’s intervention with one taken afterwards. Misinformation about the HPV vaccine was greatly reduced in the post-intervention sample, and many more posts were published by reputable public health agencies. However, there were some concerning results as well. The quality of the posts was in many cases marginal at best, and many of the search results were not in any way about the HPV vaccine; instead, focusing on the MMR or flu vaccines, or not on vaccines at all. This study was published in a special issue of the American Journal of Public Health and served as the first study to evaluate the results of intervention lead by a social media platform to curb misinformation on its platform. This study serves as both an encouragement of a commercial entity taking prosocial steps and a warning about the limitations of their approach in achieving the desired results. This article is significant insofar as it continues an important public conversation about how science should inform policy and practices, especially concerning issues of public health and safety.                                                                                                       

Guidry, J.P.D., Carlyle, K. E., Perrin, P. B., LaRose, J. G., Ryan, M., & Messner, M. (2019). A path model of psychosocial constructs predicting Zika vaccine uptake intent. Vaccine, 37, 5233-5241. 

The recent Zika virus outbreak, while no longer an international public health emergency, is still a serious threat, particularly to pregnant women and babies born to pregnant women infected with the virus. This study examined the predictive effects of psychosocial constructs on self-reported intent to get a future Zika vaccine among women of reproductive age. Data were collected using an online survey with a representative sample of 339 women ages 18–49 from the continental United States. The survey addressed variables originating with the Extended Parallel Processing Model (EPPM) as related to future Zika vaccine uptake intent. Three quarters of all respondents reported intention to get a future Zika vaccine. Path modeling revealed a direct effect of perceived susceptibility, self-efficacy, and response efficacy on future Zika vaccine uptake intent, as well as an indirect effect of perceived susceptibility through both self-efficacy and response efficacy. In addition, the final model showed an indirect effect of perceived severity on Zika vaccine uptake intent through self-efficacy and response efficacy and accounted for 54.6% of the variance in vaccination intent. These findings have implications for future Zika vaccine promotion campaigns. This study confirms the importance of perceived susceptibility, self-efficacy, and response efficacy for use in Zika vaccine uptake campaigns; in addition, when using perceived severity, both self-efficacy and response efficacy should be considered in message design.

This paper is one of the three published manuscripts from my dissertation and focused on understanding factors related to uptake intent for a possible future Zika vaccine (my dissertation research took place during the Zika outbreak in 2016-2017). Pandemic vaccines are always a concern, especially because vaccine development typically takes the better part of a decade (the current COVID-19 vaccine a notable, but rare, exception). Moreover, the increased utilization of social media to seek health information, combined with the prevalence of misinformation on these platforms, made this an important context in which to understand behavioral intentions. The study tested the Extended Parallel Process Model using path modeling and found that there was no direct path from perceived severity of Zika to future Zika vaccine uptake intent. Instead, there was a significant indirect effect through both self-efficacy and response efficacy, pointing to the recommendation of using both self- and response efficacy when using perceived severity in future Zika vaccine uptake messaging – important recommendations that would have been missed had this research not been firmly grounded in theory. Though I couldn’t have known at the time, the theoretical approaches and practical lessons I learned in designing these studies gave me the ability to pivot my research when COVID hit and take immediate steps toward contributing to our understanding of the communication environment surrounding this exploding public health crisis.

Guidry, J.P.D., Laestadius, L.I., Vraga, E.K., Miller, C.A., Perrin, P.B., Burton, C.W., Ryan, M., Fuemmeler, B.F., Carlyle, K.E. (2020). Willingness to get the COVID-19 Vaccine with and without emergency use authorization. American Journal of Infection Control, 49(2), 137-142

This study assessed psychosocial predictors of U.S. adults’ willingness to get a future COVID-19 vaccine and whether these predictors differ under an emergency use authorization (EUA) release of the vaccine. A survey of 788 U.S. adults was conducted to explore the relationships between demographics and psychosocial predictors of intent to get a future COVID-19 vaccine as well as willingness to get such a vaccine under EUA. Significant predictors of COVID-19 vaccine uptake intentions were education, having insurance, scoring high on subjective norms, a positive attitude toward the vaccine, as well as high perceived susceptibility to COVID-19, high perceived benefits of the vaccine, scoring low on barriers to the vaccine, and scoring high on self-efficacy. Predictors of willingness to take a COVID-19 vaccine under EUA were age, race/ethnicity, positive subjective norms, high perceived behavioral control, positive attitudes toward the vaccine, as well as high perceived susceptibility to COVID-19, high perceived benefits of the vaccine, low barriers to the vaccine, and scoring high on self-efficacy for getting the vaccine. Concerns about rushed vaccine development appear to reduce vaccine uptake intent, as well as willingness to get the vaccine under EUA. COVID-19 vaccine-related messages should both address concerns about the vaccine and its development and reinforce benefits of the vaccine (both factors significant in both models). Vaccine efforts may need to go beyond just communications campaigns correcting misinformation about a COVID-19 vaccine to also focus on re-establishing public trust in government agencies.

This study was one of the first COVID-19 research projects my Media+Health Lab carried out – a survey among 500 individuals focused on perceptions and barriers regarding the (then) future COVID-19 vaccine. Realizing the future vaccines would likely be approved under Emergency Use Authorization (EUA), and that this may be an issue related to trust in the vaccine’s safety, we decided to ask our questions both about a regularly approved vaccine as well one approved under EUA. Our findings were among the earlier ones to confirm a fairly high level of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, and even higher for an EUA approved vaccine. In addition, our study found that significantly fewer African American respondents expressed COVID-19 vaccine uptake intent among compared to Caucasian ones. This, of course, is a finding of great concern, since people of color are more likely to be affected by COVID-19, experience more serious consequences, and die more frequently of the disease. Keeping the attention on this health disparity and the need for culturally competent communication strategies that address historical mistrust of the medical community among African Americans is perhaps the most important contribution from this paper and laid the foundation for my current work on COVID vaccine decision aids.

Guidry, J.P.D., Meganck, S.L., Lovari, A., Messner, M., Adams, J., Sherman, S., & Medina-Messner, V. (2019). Tweeting about #diseases and #publichealth: Communicating global health issues across nations. Health Communication, 1-9.

Twitter is playing an increasing role in health communications, but little is known about the Twitter use of national health departments in general and across different nations in particular. This quantitative content analysis of 1,200 tweets from 12 national health departments showed that the topics covered in these tweets are often lacking in broad coverage – cardiovascular disease is barely mentioned, while infectious diseases are often highlighted – and the tweets do not try to initiate engagement through creating a two-way dialogue with followers. However, the tweets appear to use Health Belief Model constructs, such as initiating cues to action, mentioning self-efficacy and highlighting perceived benefits of health preventative, treatment or screening options, and this is associated with increased Twitter engagement. The paper ends with recommendations for both future studies and new challenges for the use of Twitter by national health departments.

This study focused on tweets by 12 national departments of health – two countries from each continent – and compared them based on mentioning specific health-related issues and recommendations as well as on constructs of the Health Belief Model used in their messaging. Surprisingly, in the 1200 tweet sample, only three mentioned cardiovascular disease, one of the world’s primary causes of morbidity and mortality. In addition, half of the countries (including Germany and the USA) did not address a specific health issue in more than half of their tweets; instead, often posting more general messages about agency activities like meetings, services, and travels. These messages elicited little engagement by digital publics, and while they may seem to make sense from a public relations point of view, they are likely not the most productive type of tweet for public health communication professionals or for the agencies themselves since they mostly do not satisfy local publics’ needs. Finally, while many of the tweets included Health Belief Model constructs, their focus seemed to be less on perceived threat of health issues (in the form of perceived severity and susceptibility as well as perceived barriers to solutions), and more on the potential for management of threats in the form of perceived benefits, cues to action, and self-efficacy. The problem is that unless one is convinced of the perceived threat of a specific health issue, you are unlikely to take recommended actions, no matter how beneficial they may seem. This study exemplifies one of my primary areas of focus within most content analyses I conduct, namely understanding how public health organizations are using social media to communicate about health issues. Studies like this provide a foundation for the outreach work I do to educate public health and nonprofit organizations on how to develop SMART objectives for social media and strategies for achieving health behavior change.

Articles in refereed journals:

  1. Guidry, J.P.D., Sawyer, A.N., Carlyle, K.E., & Burton, C.W. #WhyIdidntreport: Women speak out about sexual assault on Twitter. Journal of Forensic Nursing. In Press.
  2. Williams, KDA, Adkins, AE, Kuo, SI, LaRose, JG, Utsey, SO, Guidry, JPD, Spit for Science Working Group, Dick, DM & Carlyle, KE. Risk, Protective and Associated Factors of Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms and Campus Health Services Utilization Among Black Men on a College Campus. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. In Press.
  3. Williams, KDA, Adkins, AE, Kuo, SI, LaRose, JG, Utsey, SO, Guidry, JPD, Spit for Science Working Group, Dick, DM & Carlyle, KE. Mental health disorder symptom prevalence and rates of help-seeking among university-enrolled, emerging adults. Journal of American College Health. In Press.
  4. Guidry, J.P.D., Miller, C.A., Ksinan, A.J., Rohan, J.M., Winter, M.A., Carlyle, K.E., & Fuemmeler, B.F. (2021). COVID-19 related misinformation and parents of pediatric cancer patients. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 27(2), 650-652.
  5. Guidry, J.P.D., Laestadius, L.I., Vraga, E.K., Miller, C.A., Perrin, P.B., Burton, C.W., Ryan, M., Fuemmeler, B.F., Carlyle, K.E. (2020). Willingness to get the COVID-19 Vaccine with and without emergency use authorization. American Journal of Infection Control, 49(2), 137-142. 
  6. Henderson, A., Miller, C.A., Sutton, A.L., & Guidry, J.P.D. (2020). #TripleNegativeBreastCancer on Instagram. Health Education & Behavior, 1-8
  7. Rosenberg, A., Uwitonze, E., Dworkin, M., Guidry, J.P.D., Cyuzuzo, T., Banerjee, D., McIntyre, K., Carlyle, K., Uwitonze, J.M., Kabagema, I., Dushime, T, & Jayaraman, S.P. (2020). Pain in the Prehospital Setting in Rwanda: Results of a Mixed-Methods Quality Improvement Project. Pain Research and Management.  
  8. O’Donnell, N.H., & Guidry, J.P.D. (2020). #BeTheMatch: Assessing How Testimonial Narratives on Reddit Promote the Importance of Donating Bone Marrow. Journal of Health Communication, 25(8), 660-670
  9. Meganck, S.L., Smith, J.J., Guidry, J.P.D. (2020). The skills required for entry-level public relations: An analysis of skills required in 1,000 PR job ads. Public Relations Review, 46(50), 1-7
  10. Miller, C.A., Henderson, A.N., Guidry, J.P.D., McGuire, K.P., & Fuemmeler, B.F. (2020). Pinning Pink: Messages about Hereditary Breast Cancer Risk on Pinterest. Journal of Cancer Education. Published online: 08 August 2020
  11. Guidry, J.P.D., Vraga, E., Miller, C.A., Laestadius, L.I., Occa, A., Nan, X., Ming, H., Qin, Y., Fuemmeler, B.F. & Carlyle, K.E. (2020). HPV Vaccine on Pinterest: Before and After Pinterest’s Actions to Moderate Content. American Journal of Public Health, 110 (S3), S305-S311
  12. Guidry, J.P.D., Coman, I.A., Vraga, E.K., O’Donnell, N.H., & Sreepada, N. (2020). (S)pin the Flu Vaccine: Recipes for Concern. Vaccine 38, 5498-5506
  13. Burton, C.W., Guidry, J.P.D., & Cabrera, J.G. (2020). Reporting Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault: A mixed methods study of concerns and considerations among college women of color. Journal of Transcultural Nursing. Published online: 15 July 2020
  14. Alkazemi, M., Guidry, J.P.D., Messner, M., & Almutairi, E. (2020). Health beliefs on Instagram: Examining #PublicHealth Messages to Audiences in the Arab Gulf States. Health Communication. Published online: 02 September 2020.
  15. Austin, L.L., Guidry, J.P.D., & Meyer, M.L. (2020). #GunViolence on Instagram and Twitter: Examining social media advocacy in the wake of the Parkland school shootingJournal of Public Interest Communications, 4(1), 4-36
  16. Guidry, J.P.D., Austin, L.L., O’Donnell, N.H., Coman, I., Lovari, A., & Messner, M. (2020). Tweeting the #flushot: Beliefs, barriers, and perceived threats during different periods of the 2018-2019 flu season. Journal of Primary Care and Community Health11, 1-10
  17. Guidry, J.P.D., O’Donnell, N.H., Miller, C.A., Perrin, P.B., & Carlyle, K.E. (2020). Pinning despair and distress: Suicide-related visual content on Pinterest. CrisisThe Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention. Published online: May 2020
  18. Gültzow, T., Guidry, J.P.D., Schneider, F., & Hoving, C. (2020). #DoYouEvenLift: Male Body Image Portrayals on Instagram. Published online at Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 23(5), 281-289.
  19. Carlyle, K.E., Conley, A., Guidry, J.P.D. (2020). Development and Evaluation of the Red Flag Campaign for the Primary Prevention of Sexual and Dating Violence on College Campuses. Journal of American College Health. Published online: 09 March 2020
  20. Guidry, J.P.D., Sawyer, A.N., Burton, C.W. & Carlyle, K.E. (2020). #NotOkay: Stories about Abuse on Instagram and Twitter. Partner Abuse, 11(2), 117-139.
  21. Guidry, J.P.D., Meganck, S. L., Perrin, P.B., Messner, M., Lovari, A., & Carlyle, K.E. (2020). #Ebola: Tweeting and Pinning an epidemic. Atlantic Journal of Communication, 1-14
  22. Miller, C.A., Guidry, J.P.D., Dahman, B., & Thomson, M. (2020). A Tale of Two Diverse Qualtrics Samples: Information for Online Survey Researchers. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Prevention29 (4), 731-735
  23. Meganck, S.L., Guidry, J.P.D., Messner, M. & Medina-Messner, V. (2019). @JunckerEU vs. @MartinSchulz: How leading candidates in the 2014 European Parliament Elections campaigned on Twitter. First Monday.Carlyle, K. E., Guidry, J. P., Dougherty, S. A., & Burton, C. W. (2019). Intimate partner violence on Instagram: Visualizing a public health approach to prevention. Health Education & Behavior, 46(2_suppl), 90S-96S.
  24. Guidry, J. P. D., Carlyle, K. E., Perrin, P. B., LaRose, J. G., Ryan, M., & Messner, M. (2019). A path model of psychosocial constructs predicting Zika vaccine uptake intent. Vaccine, 37, 5233-5241. 
  25. Miller, C. A., Guidry, J. P., & Fuemmeler, B. F. (2019). Breast Cancer Voices on Pinterest: Raising Awareness or Just an Inspirational Image? Health Education & Behavior, 46(2_suppl), 49S-58S.
  26. Laestadius, L., Guidry, J.P.D., Greskoviak, G., & Anderson, J. (2019). Making “Weedish Fish”: An Exploratory Analysis of Cannabis Recipes on Pinterest. Substance Use and Misuse, 54(13), 2191-2197.doi: 10.1080/10826084.2019.1638410
  27. Guidry, J.P.D., Meganck, S.L., Lovari, A., Messner, M., Adams, J., Sherman, S., & Medina-Messner, V. (2019). Tweeting about #diseases and #publichealth: Communicating global health issues across nations. Health Communication, 1-9.
  28. Guidry, J. P. D., Kim, S., Cacciatore, M. A., Jin, Y., & Messner, M. (2019). Dissecting the root of vaccine misinformation on Pinterest: Examining anti-vaccine organizations’ conflict strategies and risk communication. The Electronic Journal of Communication.
  29. Guidry, J.P.D. & Benotsch, E.  (2019). Pinning to Cope: Using Pinterest for Chronic Pain Management. Health Education and Behavior. doi: 10.1177/1090198118824399
  30. Carlyle, K.E., Guidry, J.P.D. & Burton, C.W. (2019). Recipes for Prevention: An Analysis of Intimate Partner Violence Messages on Pinterest. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. doi:10.1177/0886260518812073
  31. Guidry, J.P.D., Carlyle, K.E., LaRose, J. G., Perrin, P., Messner, M., & Ryan, M. (2019). Using the Health Belief Model to Analyze Instagram Posts about Zika for Public Health Communications. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 25(1), 179.
  32. Guidry, J.P.D., Carlyle, K.E., LaRose, J.G., Perrin, P., Ryan, M., Messner, M., & Adams, J. (2018). Framing and visual type: Effect on future Zika vaccine uptake intent. Journal of Public Health Research, 7(1). 
  33. Carlyle, K. E., Guidry, J. P. D., Williams, K., Tabaac, A., & Perrin, P. B. (2018). Suicide conversations on Instagram™: contagion or caring? Journal of Communication in Healthcare, 11(1), 12-18. 
  34. Guidry, J.P.D., Austin, L. L., Carlyle, K. E., Freberg, K., Cacciatore, M., Jin, Y., & Messner, M. (2018). Welcome or Not: Comparing# Refugee Posts on Instagram and Pinterest. American Behavioral Scientist, 62(4), 512-531.
  35. Guidry, J.P.D., Haddad, L.G., Jin, Y., & Zhang, Y. (2017). #Hookah, #Shisha, #Narghile: The portrayal of #waterpipe smoking on Instagram. Journal of Healthcare Communications, 2(3).
  36. Guidry, J.P.D., Jin, Y., Orr, C.A., Messner, M., & Meganck, S. (2017). #Ebola on Instagram and Twitter: How health organizations address the health crisis in their social media engagement. Public Relations Review, 43(3), 477-486.
  37. Messner, M., Medina-Messner, V., & Guidry, J. (2016). Global Health and Social Media: Using Instagram and Twitter in an open online class for global service-learning projects. Communication Teacher, 30(4), 185-189.
  38. Guidry, J.P.D., Jin, Y., Smith, J., Zhang, Y., & Haddad, L. (2016). How health risks are pinpointed (or not) on social media: The portrayal of waterpipe smoking on Pinterest. Health Communication, 31(6), 659-667.
  39. Guidry, J.P.D., Zhang, Y., Jin, Y., & Parrish, C. (2016). Portrayals of Depression on Pinterest and Why Public Relations Practitioners Should Care. Public Relations Review, 42(1), 232-234.
  40. Messner, M., & Guidry, J.P.D. (2015). Considering ethics in visual storytelling: A study of nonprofit organisations on Instagram. Prism12(2).
  41. Guidry, J.P.D., Messner, M., Carlyle, K., & Jin, Y. (2015). On pins and needles: How vaccines are portrayed on Pinterest. Vaccine 33, 5051-5056
  42. Guidry, J.P.D., Messner, M., Jin, Y., & Medina-Messner, V. (2015). From #mcdonaldsfail to #dominossucks: An analysis of Instagram images about the 10 largest fast food companies. Corporate Communications: An International Journal 20(3), 344-359
  43. Guidry, J.P.D., Waters, R. D., & Saxton, G. D. (2014). Moving social marketing beyond personal change to social change: Strategically using Twitter to mobilize supporters into vocal advocates. Journal of Social Marketing 4(3),240-260

Book chapters

  1. Jin, Y., Austin, L., Guidry, J.P.D. & Parrish, C. (2018). Picture This and Take That: Strategic Crisis Visuals and Visual Social Media (VSM) in Crisis Communication. In: S. Duhé, (Ed.), New Media and Public Relations (3rd edition). New York, NY: Peter Lang Publishing.
  2. Guidry, J.P.D., & Messner, M. (2017). Health Misinformation on Social Media: The Case of Vaccine Safety on Pinterest. In: Austin, L., & Jin, Y. (Eds.), Social Media and Crisis Communication. New York, NY: Routledge.
  3. Guidry, J.P.D., Messner, M., & Saxton, G. D. (2015). Tweeting Charities: Perceptions, Resources, and Effective Twitter Practices for the Nonprofit Sector. In: Waters, R. D. (Ed.), Public Relations Theory and Practice in the Nonprofit Sector. New York, NY: Routledge.

Editorials

  1. Guidry, J.P.D., Anderson, C., Vachhani, P., Grove, L., & Mpody, C. (2018). Why words matter. American Journal of Public Health, 108(3), 321-322.
  2. Patel, S., Anderson, C., Mpody, C., Vachhani, P., Guidry, J., & Grove, L. (2018). Academic Literacy: Reaching Our Own. American Journal of Public Health, 108(1), 6.

Articles in refereed journals – under review/Revise & Resubmit:

  1. Carlyle, K.E., Conley, A., Guidry, J.P.D., & Underwood, J. Using theory to develop a unified bystander intervention measure in dating violence: The Multidimensional Bystander Assessment Tool. Revise and Resubmit at Violence Against Women
  2. Guidry, J.P.D., Austin, L.L., O’Donnell, N. H. & Grove, L. Hot or cold: #climatechange societal sentiment on Pinterest. Revise and Resubmit at Environmental Communication.
    Laestadius, L.I., Wang, Y., Guidry, J.D.G., & Engelmann, J. #AdultsLikeFlavors: Vaping (self) advocacy on Instagram, Under review at Tobacco Control.
  3. Guidry, J.P.D., Austin, L.L., Tabaac, A., Meganck, S.L., Jin, Y., Messner, M., & Carlyle, K.E. Voices of the #FlintWaterCrisis: An Analysis of Conversations on Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. Under review at Journal of Applied Communication.
  4. Guidry, J.P.D., Perrin, P.B., Laestadius, L.I., Vraga, E.K., Miller, C.A., Fuemmeler, B.F., Burton, C.W., Ryan, M., & Carlyle, K.E. U.S. Public Support for COVID-19 Vaccine Donation to Low- and Middle-Income Countries during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Revise and Resubmit at Vaccine.
  5. Guidry, J.P.D., Perrin, P.B., Bol, N., Song, B., Hong, C., Lovari, A., Coman, I.A., O’Donnell, N.H., Alkazemi, M., Niu, J., Pabian, S.J.R., Lin, A., Miller, C.A., & Carlyle, K.E. U.S. Public Support for COVID-19 Vaccine Donation to Low- and Middle-Income Countries during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Under review at Global Health Promotion.
  6. Guidry, J.P.D., Carlyle, K.E., Miller, C.A., Ksinan, A., Winn, R., & Fuemmeler, B.F. The spread of COVID-19 related misinformation among cancer survivors. Under review at Patient Education and Counseling.

Refereed Conference Presentations

  1. Guidry, J.P.D., O’Donnell, N.H., Meganck, S.L., Lovari, A., Messner, M., Hill, A., &Medina-Messner, V. (March 2021). Tweeting a Pandemic: Communicating #COVID19 across the globe. Accepted for presentation at the IPRRC 2021 Conference 
  2. Guidry, J.P.D., Perrin, P.B., Bol, N.,Song, B., Hong, C., Lovari, A., Coman, I.A., O’Donnell, N.H., Alkazemi, M. F., Pabian, S. & Carlyle, K. (November 2020). Social Distancing: Threat and Efficacy among University Students in Seven Nations. Presented at the 2020 APHA conference. 
  3. Guidry, J.P.D., Miller, C.A., Ksinan, A.J., Rohan, J.M., Winter, M.A., Carlyle, K.E., & Fuemmeler, B.F. (November 2020). COVID-19 related misinformation and parents of pediatric cancer patients. Presented at the 2020 APHA conference.
  4. Guidry, J.P.D., Sawyer, A.N., Meganck, S.L. (November 2020). Transgender individuals and intimate partner violence: An in-depth perspective. Presented at the 2020 APHA conference.
  5. Guidry, J.P.D. (November 2020). HPV vaccine searches on Pinterest: Before and after Pinterest’s actions to moderate content. Presented at the 2020 APHA conference.
  6. Guidry, J.P.D., Burton, C.B., Ngenye, L., Coman, I., & Carlyle, K.E. (July 2020). Speaking out about #FGM: Messages and visuals on Twitter. Paper accepted for oral presentation at the Nursing Network of Violence Against Women International Conference, Malmö, Sweden CANCELLED DUE TO COVID-19
  7. Burton, C.B., Guidry, J.P.D., & Carlyle, K.E. (July 2020). Social Media in Research and Education: Yes, you need it! Paper accepted for oral presentation at the Nursing Network of Violence Against Women International Conference, Malmö, Sweden CANCELLED DUE TO COVID-19
  8. Guidry, J.P.D., Miller, C.A., Hayes, R., Carlyle, K.E., & Fuemmeler, B.F. (April 2020).  Pinning, planning, preparing meals: Parental childhood feeding practices and Pinterest. Paper accepted for presentation at the Society for Behavioral Medicine’s Annual Conference in San Francisco, CA CANCELLED DUE TO COVID-19
  9. Miller, C.A., Henderson, A., Guidry, J.P.D., & Fuemmeler, B.F. (April 2020).  #coloncancer: Who is tweeting what? Paper accepted for presentation at the Society for Behavioral Medicine’s Annual Conference in San Francisco, CA  CANCELLED DUE TO COVID-19
  10. Pagoto, S., Tiro, J., Guidry, J.P.D., Hoffman, B., & Fuemmeler, B.F. (April 2020). Paper accepted for presentation at the Society for Behavioral Medicine’s Annual Conference in San Francisco, CA  CANCELLED DUE TO COVID-19
  11. Guidry, J.P.D., Meganck, S.L., O’Donnell, N.H., Lovari, A., Medina-Messner, V., Hill, A. & Messner, M. (March 2020). When Public Health meets Twitter: Communicating #globalhealth issues across the globe. Presented at the Institute for Public Relations’ 23th International Public Relations Research Conference, Miami, FL. International Aberje Award.
  12. Guidry, J.P.D., Carlyle, K.E., Johnson, J.J., Bodnar-Deren, S., Williams, K., & Dick, D. (November 2019). College students and social media use: a qualitative study. Presented at the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, PA
  13. Guidry, J.P.D., O’Donnell, N.H., Adams, J. (August 2019). Promoting pro-environmental behaviors through visual social media. Presented at the 102nd Annual AEJMC National Conference. Toronto, Canada
    2019 Emerging Scholar Award
  14. Guidry, J.P.D., Austin, L.L., Coman, I., O’Donnell, N.H., Lovari, A., & Messner, M. (August 2019). Tweeting the #flushot: Beliefs, barriers, and perceived threat at different points of the flu season. Presented at the 102nd Annual AEJMC National Conference. Toronto, Canada, 
  15. O’Donnell, N.H., & Guidry, J.P.D. (August 2019). #BeTheMatch: Assessing How Testimonial Narratives on Reddit Promote the Importance of Donating Bone Marrow. Presented at the 102nd Annual AEJMC National Conference. Toronto, Canada
    Second Place Faculty Paper, CTEC Division
  16. Guidry, J.P.D., Sawyer, A.N., Carlyle, K.E., & Burton, C.W. (July 2019). #WhyIdidntreport: Women speak out about sexual assault on Twitter. Presented at IAMCR Conference in Madrid, Spain
  17. Guidry, J.P.D., Coman, I.A., Vraga, E.K., O’Donnell, N.H., & Sreepada, N. (July 2019). (S)pin the Flu Vaccine: Recipes for Concern. Presented at IAMCR Conference in Madrid, Spain
  18. Guidry, J.P.D., O’Donnell, N.H., Miller, C.A., Carlyle, K.E., Perrin, P.B. (May 2019). Pinning pain, despair, and distress: Suicide-related visual content on Pinterest. Presented at the International Communication Association’s Annual Conference. Washington, D.C.
  19. Austin, L.L., Guidry, J.P.D., & Meyer, M.L.  (May 2019). #GunViolence on Instagram and Twitter: Examining social media advocacy in the wake of the Parkland school shooting. Presented at the International Communication Association’s Annual Conference. Washington, D.C.
  20. Guidry, J.P.D., Vraga, E., Ming, H., Qin, Y., Laestadius, L., Nan, X., Occa, A., Carlyle, K. E., & Fuemmeler, B.F. (April 2019). Vaccines among Recipes: A Content Analysis of HPV Vaccine Posts on Pinterest. Paper presented at the DC Health Communication (DCHC) conference. Washington, D.C.
  21. Guidry, J.P.D., Carlyle, K. E., Perrin, P. B., LaRose, J. G., Ryan, M., & Messner, M. (April 2019). A path model of psychosocial constructs predicting Zika vaccine uptake intent. Paper presented at the DC Health Communication (DCHC) conference. Washington, D.C.
  22. Williams K., Dougherty, S., Carlyle K., & Guidry, J.P.D. (April 2019). #theblackmancan #blackboyjoy: Using Social Media to Challenge Perceptions of Black Masculinity on Instagram. Richmond, VA. 2019.  Paper presented at the 2019 DC Health Communication Conference, Fairfax, VA
  23. Guidry, J.P.D., Fugate-Laus, K., Hayes, R. B., & Fuemmeler, B.F. (March 2019).  Possibilities for prevention: Pinning children’s recipes. Paper presented at the Society for Behavioral Medicine’s Annual Conference. Washington, D.C.
  24. Guidry, J.P.D., Miller, C. A., Tan, A. S. L., & Adams, J.W. (March 2019). Vaping on visual social media: Smokescreen or solution? Paper presented at the Society for Behavioral Medicine’s Annual Conference. Washington, D.C.
  25. Hayes, R. B., Guidry, J.P.D., & Fugate-Laus, K. (March 2019). Relationships between BMI, binge eating, stressful life events, and potentially traumatic events among first year college students. Paper presented at the Society for Behavioral Medicine’s Annual Conference. Washington, D.C. 
  26. Miller, C.A, Guidry, J.P.D., & Fuemmeler B.F. (March 2019). #ColonCancer text and visuals: Colorectal Cancer on Twitter and Instagram. Presented at the Society of Behavioral Medicine. Washington, DC
  27. Alkazemi, M., Guidry, J.P.D., Messner, M., & Almutairi, E. (March 2019). Health beliefs on Instagram: Examining #PublicHealth Messages to Audiences in the Arab Gulf States. Paper presented at the 2019 International Public Relations Research Conference in Orlando, FL 
  28. Miller, C.A & Guidry, J.P.D. (February 2019). A tale of two diverse Qualtrics samples: Information for online survey researchers. Poster presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Special Conference on Modernizing Population Sciences in the Digital Age. San Diego, CA 
    Henderson, A., Miller, C. A., & Guidry, J.P.D.  (November 2018). Triple-Negative Breast Cancer on Instagram. Presented at the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA 
  29. Dent, R., Sawyer, A.N., Guidry, J.P.D., & Williams, K. (November 2018). #blackmentalhealth on Instagram. Presented at the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA
  30. Guidry, J.P.D., Austin, L.L. & Grove, L. (August 2018). Hot or cold: #climatechange societal sentiment on Pinterest. Presented at the AEJMC Annual Conference in Washington, DC 
  31. Kim, S., Austin, L.L., & Guidry, J.P.D. (August 2018). Checking in During Irma: Investigating Motivations, Emotions, and Narratives on Facebook’s Safety Check Feature. Presented at the AEJMC Annual Conference in Washington, DC
  32. Guidry, J.P.D., Austin, L.L., Kim, S., & Song, B. (July 2018). Crisis narratives of Harvey and Irma: Conversations on Twitter and Instagram. Presented at the annual BledCom conference, Bled, Slovenia 
  33. Guidry, J.P.D., Carlyle, K.E., LaRose, J.G., Perrin, P., Ryan, M., & Messner, M. (May 2018). Framing and visual type: Effect on Zika vaccine uptake intent. Presented at the International Communication Association (ICA) conference in Prague, Czech Republic 
  34. Miller, C., & Guidry, J.P.D. (May 2018). Breast Cancer Voices on Pinterest: Raising Awareness or Just a Cutesy Slogan? Presented at the International Communication Association (ICA) conference in Prague, Czech Republic 
  35. Peterson, E., Guidry, J.P.D., Kelley, D., & Vraga, E. (April 2018). Trust and (Mis)information in the Era of Social Media: From Theory to Practice. Panel presentation at the Society of Behavioral Medicine, New Orleans, LA
  36. Guidry, J.P.D., Carlyle, K.E., LaRose, J.G., Perrin, P., Ryan, M., & Messner, M. (April 2018). Framing and visual type: Effect on Zika vaccine uptake intent. Presented at Women’s Health Research Day, VCU, Richmond, VA
  37. Guidry, J.P.D., Carlyle, K., Austin, L., Messner, M. & Jin, Y. (2017 November). Hot or cold: #climatechange vs. #globalwarming societal sentiment portrayed in visuals on Pinterest. Presented at the American Public Health Association (APHA) Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA
  38. Tabaac, A., & Guidry, J.P.D. (November 2017). Bathroom talk: An analysis of the social media conversations surrounding North Carolina’s House Bill 2 and subsequent transgender bathroom access issues. Presented at the American Public Health Association (APHA) Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA
  39. Miller, C., Henderson, A., & Guidry, J.P.D. (November 2017). Genetic Testing on Social Media: An Evaluation of Engagement with Breast Cancer-Related Pinterest Visuals. Presented at the American Public Health Association (APHA) Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA
  40. Sawyer, A.N., & Guidry, J.P.D. (November 2017). #DefundPP: Perspectives on legislation to defund Planned Parenthood health centers.  Presented at the American Public Health Association (APHA) Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA
  41. Guidry, J.P.D., Hoving, C., Miller, C., Carlyle, K., Tan, A., & Messner, M. (October 2017). Ecigarettes on Social Media: Smokescreen or Substance? How people talk about ecigarette smoking on Pinterest. Presented at the International Conference for Communication in Healthcare (ICCH) Conference, Baltimore, MD
  42. Guidry, J.P.D., Sawyer, A.N., Williams, K., Tabaac, A., & Carlyle, K. (October 2017). #NotOkay: Stories about abuse on Instagram and Twitter. Presented at the International Conference for Communication in Healthcare (ICCH) Conference, Baltimore, MD
  43. Guidry, J.P.D. (April 2017). #Zika on Instagram: How publics discuss the health crisis through online visuals and text. Paper presented at the DC Health Communication Conference, Fairfax, VA
  44. Guidry, J.P.D., Orr, C.A. (April 2017). Pinning about #IPV: The discussion about Intimate Partner Violence on Pinterest. Paper presented at the DC Health Communication Conference, Fairfax, VA
  45. Guidry, J.P.D., Sawyer, A.N., Williams, K, & Carlyle, K. (April 2017). #NotOkay: Stories about abuse on Instagram and Twitter: Methods. Poster presented at the DC Health Communication Conference, Fairfax, VA
  46. Guidry, J.P.D., Meganck, S.L., Lovari, A., Messner, M., Adams, J., Sherman, S., & Medina-Messner, V. (March 2017). Tweeting about #diseases and #publichealth: Communicating global health issues across nations.  Paper presented at the Institute for Public Relations’ 20th International Public Relations Research Conference, Miami, FL. International Aberje Award.
  47. Guidry, J.P.D., Orr, C.A., Goyal, M., Tabaac, A., Carlyle, K. & Messner, M. (October 2016). Voices of the #FlintWaterCrisis: An Analysis of Conversations on Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. Paper presented in the Public Health Education and Health Promotion section at the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting, Denver, CO
  48. Guidry, J.P.D., Orr, C.A., Williams, K., Goyal, M., Perrin, P., Carlyle, K. & Messner, M. (October 2016). Suicide Conversations on Instagram: Contagion or Caring? Paper presented in the Public Health Education and Health Promotion section at the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting, Denver, CO
  49. Miller, C.A. & Guidry, J.P.D. (September 2016). Cancer and Genetic Testing on Pinterest and Instagram: Who Posts What? Presented at the Ninth American Academy of Cancer Research Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
  50. Jin, Y., Guidry, J.P.D., Orr, C.A., Wojdynski, B., Lee, Yen-I., Messner, M., Carlyle, K., & Meganck, S.L. (September 2016). Getting the “Picture” Out about Zika: Effects of Framing, Visual Type and Source on Emotions and Intended Preventive Behaviors. Paper presented at the EUPRERA conference, Groningen/Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  51. Guidry, J.P.D., Orr, C.A., Goyal, M., Freberg, K., Meganck, S.L., Carlyle, K., Jin, Y. & Messner, M. (September 2016). Welcome or Not: Comparing The #Refugees Conversation on Instagram And Pinterest. Paper presented at the EUPRERA conference, Groningen/Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  52. Guidry, J.P.D., Waters, R., Adams, J., Orr, C.A., Trin, S., Meganck, S.L. & Messner, M. (August 2016). Does anyone understand? A content analysis of health infographics on Pinterest. Paper presented at the AEJMC Conference, Minnesota, MN
  53. Guidry, J.P.D., Orr, C.A., Adams, J., Waters, R., Messner, M. & Meganck, S.L. (September 2016). Health Infographics on Pinterest: More Than Just A Pretty Picture. Paper presented at the European Association for Communication in Healthcare conference, Heidelberg, Germany
  54. Guidry, J.P.D., Orr, C.A., Goyal, M., Adams, J., Hoving, C., Schneider, F., Meganck, S.L., Messner, M., Jin, Y. & Carlyle, K. (September 2016). Ecigarettes On Social Media: Smokescreen or Solution? How People Talk About Ecigarette Smoking on Instagram. Paper presented at the European Association for Communication in Healthcare conference, Heidelberg, Germany
  55. Guidry, J.P.D., Orr, C.A., Carlyle, K., Messner, M. & Jin, Y. (September 2016). Framing Fears: The Anti-vaccine Movement on Pinterest And Lessons We Can Learn. Paper presented at the European Association for Communication in Healthcare conference, Heidelberg, Germany
  56. Guidry, J.P.D., Orr, C.A. & Carlyle, K. (September 2016). Visual Social Media: An Overview of The Current State of Research. Paper presented at the European Association for Communication in Healthcare conference, Heidelberg, Germany
  57. Guidry, J.P.D., Carlyle, K., Orr, C., Glace, A., Tabaac, A., Conley, A., & Briones, R. 
    (April 2016). Tweeting #WhyIleft and #WhyIstayed: Analyzing the conversation around intimate partner violence on Twitter. Paper presented at VCU International Women’s Health Research Day, Richmond, VA
  58. Guidry, J.P.D., Orr, C.A., Goyal, M., Tabaac, A., Perrin, P., Carlyle, K. & Messner, M. (April 2016). Voices#GunViolence on Instagram and Twitter: The Conversation in the Wake of the San Bernardino Shootings. Paper presented at the Kentucky Conference on Health Communication, Lexington, KY
  59. Guidry, J.P.D., Messner, M., Jin, Y., Meganck, S., & Niyirora, J. (March 2016). #Ebola on Instagram and Twitter: How health organizations address the health crisis in their social media engagement. Paper presented at the annual Forbes Graduate Research Colloquium, Richmond, VA
  60. Guidry, J.P.D., Orr, C.A., Kim, S., Cacciatore, M., Jin, Y., & Messner, M. (March 2016). Dissecting the root of vaccine misinformation on Pinterest: Examining anti-vaccine organizations’ conflict strategies and risk communication.  Paper presented at the Institute for Public Relations’ 19th International Public Relations Research Conference, Miami, FL. International Aberje Award.
  61. Guidry, J.P.D., Meganck, S.L., Messner, M., Carlyle, K., & Goyal, M. (November 2015). CDC, Facebook, Ebola, and everything else: How publics respond to the CDC posts about the recent Ebola outbreak compared to other public health topics. Paper presented in the Public Health Education and Health Promotion section at the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL
  62. Guidry, J.P.D., Zhang, Y., Jin, Y., & Kim, S. (November 2015). Depression on Pinterest: How Pinterest users respond to pins about depression in the light of social support and coping. Paper presented in the Public Health Education and Health Promotion section at the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL
  63. Guidry, J.P.D., Carlyle, K., Orr, C., Glace, A., Tabaac, A., Conley, A., & Briones, R. 
    (November 2015). Tweeting #WhyIleft and #WhyIstayed: Analyzing the conversation around intimate partner violence on Twitter. Paper presented in the Public Health Education and Health Promotion section at the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL
  64. Guidry, J.P.D., Haddad, L., Jin, Y., & Zhang, Y. (October 2015). How health risks are pinpointed (or not) on social media: The portrayal of waterpipe smoking on Instagram. Paper presented at VCU Watts Day, Richmond, VA
  65. Messner, M., Guidry, J.P.D., & Iroegbu, O. (September 2015). Mobile news reporting on Instagram: How major US news organisations engage their audiences via visual social media. Presentation at the Future of Journalism Conference in Cardiff, UK.
  66. Guidry, J.P.D., Meganck, S.L., Messner, M., Carlyle, K., Park, E. & Niyirora, J. (August 2015). Disease outbreaks on Twitter: An analysis of tweets during the #Ebola and #measles crises. Paper presented in the ComSHER division at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Conference, San Francisco, CA
  67. Guidry, J.P.D., Meganck, S.L., Messner, M. & Medina-Messner, V. (August 2015). @JunckerEU vs. @MartinSchulz: How leading candidates in the 2014 European Parliament Elections campaigned on Twitter.Paper presented in the CTEC division at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Conference, San Francisco, CA
  68. Guidry, J.P.D. & Messner, M. (May 2015). Health Misinformation on Social Media: The Case of Vaccine Safety on Pinterest. Paper presented at the ICA Conference, Puerto Rico. Top Four Paper Award, Health Communication Division.
  69. Messner, M. & Guidry, J.P.D. (May 2015). Considering Ethics in Visual Storytelling: A Study of Nonprofit Organizations on Instagram. Paper presented at the ICA Conference, Puerto Rico
  70. Guidry, J.P.D., Meganck, S., Messner, M., Carlyle, K., & Niyirora, J. (April 2015). #Ebola on Pinterest and Twitter: How publics address the health crisis in the light of risk perception and health behaviors. Paper presented at the DCHC Conference, Washington, DC
  71. Guidry, J.P.D., Haddad, L., Jin, Y., Zhang, Y. & Niyirora, J. (April 2015). How health risks are pinpointed (or not) on social media: The portrayal of waterpipe smoking on Instagram. Paper presented at the DCHC Conference, Washington, DC
  72. Messner, M., Guidry, J.P.D., Zhang, Y., Sabo, R., Robins, J., Longo, D., & Niyirora, J. (April 2015). Diabetes on Facebook: A case study of the social media engagement of the American Diabetes Association with its publics.Paper presented at the DCHC Conference, Washington, DC
  73. Guidry, J.P.D., Jin, Y., Zhang, Y. & Parrish, C. (April 2015). Communicating depression on Pinterest: Portrayals of depression and why public relations practitioners should care. Paper presented at the Southern States Communication Association Conference, Tampa, FL
  74. Guidry, J.P.D. & Orr, C. A. (April 2015). The convergence of the use of social media and the use of health behavior theories in HPV vaccine uptake interventions. Paper presented at the 11th Annual Women’s Health Research Day, Richmond, VA
  75. Guidry, J.P.D. (April 2015). On pins and needles: How vaccines are portrayed on Pinterest. Paper presented at the annual Forbes Graduate Research Colloquium, Richmond, VA
  76. Guidry, J.P.D., Messner, M., Jin, Y., Meganck, S., & Niyirora, J. (March 2015). #Ebola on Instagram and Twitter: How health organizations address the health crisis in their social media engagement.  Paper presented at the Institute for Public Relations’ 17th International Public Relations Research Conference, Miami, FL. Top Three Papers of Practical Significance.
  77. Guidry, J.P.D., Jin, Y., & Zhang, Y. (October 2014). Framing Public Health Issues with Images: How Pinterest Tells Stories of Depression. Paper presented at the Digital Disruption in Journalism and Mass Communication Theory Conference, Brussels, Belgium.
  78. Guidry, J.P.D. (August 2014). On pins and needles: How vaccines are portrayed on Pinterest. Paper presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication conference, Montreal, Canada. Top Student Paper, ComSHER Division.
  79. Guidry, J.P.D., Waters, R. D., & Saxton, G. D. (August 2014). Creating social change with public relations: Strategically using Twitter to turn supporters into vocal advocates. Paper presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication conference, Montreal, Canada.
  80. Guidry, J.P.D., Messner, M., Jin, Y., & Medina-Messner, V. (March 2014). From #mcdonaldsfail to #dominossucks: An analysis of Instagram images about the 10 largest fast food companies. Paper presented at the Institute for Public Relations’ 17th International Public Relations Research Conference, Miami, FL. Top Three Papers for Practical Significance.
  81. Guidry, J.P.D. (August 2013). A tale of many tweets: How stakeholders respond to nonprofit organizations’ tweets. Paper presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication conference, Washington, D.C. Top Three Student Paper, CTEC Division.

RESEARCH GRANT FUNDING

Funded

2021 – COVID Storytelling and Message Testing. Funding Source: The Institute for Integrative Health ($38,146, Co-I).

2020 – Internal funding, VCU Health, Dr. Kellerman and VCU Office of Research, Dr. Sriram Rao
Funding to develop a COVID-19 Vaccine Decision Aid ($55,000, PI)

2020 – Yards of tomorrow: Promoting public health and ecosystem health in the Lower James River basin. Funding source: The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality’s Chesapeake Bay Implementation Grant ($14,100, Co-I). 

2019 – Lived Experiences Related to Health Care for the Virginia Transgender Community. James Madison University Office of Strategic Planning. ($4,500, Co-I).

2019 – #Doesanybodycare: Encouraging Suicide-and Depression-Related Bystander Behavior on InstagramFunding Source: Virginia Commonwealth University (Funded, $49,893, PI).

2019 – Tell me about the #fluvaccine: Using narratives to encourage vaccinationFunding Source: Arthur Page Center (Funded, $5,000, PI).

2019 – Promoting public health and ecosystem health in the Lower James River basin. Funding Source: The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (Funded, $11,420, Co-I).

2019 – Promoting pro-environmental behaviors through visual social media. Funding Source: AEJMC’s Emerging Scholar Grant Program (Funded, $3,477.50, PI).

2018 – #Social4Health: Promoting College Student Social and Mental Wellbeing using Social Media. Seed Award from the VCU College of Humanities and Sciences (Funded, $5,000, PI).

2017 – Posting and Snapping about Wall and Travel Ban: Designing Ethical Social Media Strategies for Visual Messaging on Immigration Issues. Finding source: Arthur Page Center (Funded, $3,000, co-I).


Not funded

2020 – The Red Flag Campaign: Creating Protective Environments and Promoting Social Norms to Prevent Sexual Violence on College Campuses. Funding source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ($2,247,399, Co-I)

2019 – Assessing the Grooming Process in Trafficking Among College Students in Central Virginia: An Empirical Study. Funder: National Institute of Justice ($1,125,000, Co-I)

2019 – A Public Health Approach to Human Trafficking Prevention: The Development of a Training of Trainer Model for Promoting Screening among Healthcare Providers. Funding Source: VCU Center for Clinical and Translational Research ($129,395, Co-I).

2019 – #Doesanybodycare: Encouraging Suicide-and Depression-Related Bystander Behavior on InstagramFunding Source: Arthur Page Center ($14,640.50, PI).

2018 – To forward or not: The effect of Zika vaccine (mis)information on WhatsApp. Funding Source: Facebook Research and WhatsApp Research Awards for Social Science and Misinformation. (Not funded, $18,072, PI).

2018 – #Doesanybodycare: Encouraging Suicide-and Depression-Related Bystander Behavior on InstagramFunding Source: Facebook Research ($25,840, PI).

2018 – Putting a ‘Pin’ in Childhood Obesity: Improving Cancer Prevention Messaging in the New Media Environment. Grant submitted for review to VCU Massey Cancer Center Multi-Investigator Award Program. Co-PI ($100,000). Invited to submit full proposal. 

2017 – #Social4Health: Promoting College Student Social and Mental Wellbeing using Social Media. Grant submitted for review to VCU College of Humanities and Sciences Dean’s Scholarship Catalyst and Seed Awards Program. Co-PI ($19,880). Ranked: Priority for funding. 

2017 – Preventing Sexual and Dating Violence among LGBTQ+ College Students: An Application of the Red Flag Campaign. Grant submitted for review to the National Institute of Justice in March 2017. Co-I ($504,179). 

2017 – The Red Flag Campaign: Building the Evidence Base for a Comprehensive Bystander Intervention to Prevent Sexual and Dating Violence on College Campuses. Grant submitted for review to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in March 2017. Co-I ($1,037,779). Impact Score: 30.